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Ramleh, from the West

Ramleh, from the west. Ramleh was founded by the Arabs in A.D. 716, and for some time thereafter it was the capital of the Arab province (djund) of Filastin (Palestine).

Overlooking the Village of Askar

Horseman overlooking the village of Askar east of Nablus, central Palestine.

On the Slopes of Mount Tabor

Horseman overlooking the village of Daburiyyah on the slopes of Mount Tabor, Galilee.

Looking Toward Marj Ibn Amer

Standing figure looking toward Marj Ibn Amer (the Plain of Jezreel).

View of Shepherds' Field from Bethlehem

Shepherds' Field as seen from Bethlehem. The village in the background is Beit Sahur. Note the terraces.

The Village of Battir

The village of Battir, southwest of Jerusalem.

General View of Jenin

A general view of Jenin, central Palestine. (Bonfils)

Village of Ein Karim

The village of Ein Karim, west of Jerusalem. (Bonfils)

Mar Saba

The Christian monastery of Mar Saba, commemorating a Byzantine ascetic of this name who died in A.D. 531. The monastery is located in the wilderness southeast of Jerusalem. Mar is the Arabic word for "saint." Many Palestinian Muslim shrines honor Hebrew prophets and Christian saints.

The Mosque of Nabi Samu'il

The Mosque of Nabi Samu'il (the prophet Samuel), just northwest of Jerusalem. (Bonfils)

Tomb of Nabi Yusuf

The Muslim shrine at the traditional tomb of Nabi Yusuf (the prophet Joseph), east of Nablus.

Auja al-Hafir

Auja al-Hafir, near the Egyptian border; in the foreground is the central square. Note the Ottoman army camps on the outskirts.

Gaza, "The City of Hashim"

Gaza, "the City of Hashim"; so called because Gaza is the burial place of Hashim, grandfather of the prophet Muhammad. (Bonfils)

Hebron (Al-Khalil)

Hebron (aI-Khalil in Arabic). The Arabic name means "friend" or "companion," the reference being to Abraham, the "friend" or "companion" of God, who is believed by Muslims as well as Jews to have been buried in Hebron.

The Old City of Jerusalem from the Church of the Saviour

The Old City of Jerusalem (looking east toward the Mount of Olives) as seen from the belfry of the Church of St. Saviour. Note the Mosque of the Dome of the Rock, top right. (Bonfils)

Russian Pilgrims at the Jordan River

Russian pilgrims at the Jordan River. Following the development of steamship navigation, the number of Christian pilgrims from Europe greatly increased.

The White Mosque

The minaret of the White Mosque at Ramleh; also known as the Tower of the Forty Martyrs. Rebuilt in A.D. 1318, it was situated at the midpoint of the mosque enclosure's north wall. The mosque is otherwise in ruins. (Bonfils)

Mount of Olives

Aerial view of the Mount of Olives, looking toward the Dead Sea.

Jericho's Orchards

Orchards in Jericho. Many wealthy Palestinians from Jerusalem had winter houses in Jericho.

Ein Karim

Ein Karim, west of Jerusalem

Silwan

The village and valley of Silwan, just east of the walls of Jerusalem, looking south. In the distance note Government House, the residence of the British high commissioner, on the so-called Hill of Evil Counsel!

Abu Ghosh

Abu Ghosh, about fourteen kilometers from Jerusalem, on the road to Jaffa.

Beit Sahur from Shepherds' Field

Beit Sahur seen from Shepherds' Field near Bethlehem, looking east.

Hills of Bethlehem

The hills of Bethlehem. Note the traditional headdress.

Auja River

Water mill on the Auja River near Jaffa.

Hills of Kolonia

Terraced hills seen from Kolonia, a village on the road to Jaffa about eight kilometers west of Jerusalem.

St. George Monastery

The Orthodox monastery of St. George on the Mount of Temptation in the wildemess near Jericho.

Casting Nets

Fishermen of the Sea of Galilee.

Grains (1)

Grains: of 4,367,629 dunams under grain cultivation, the Palestinians owned and cultivated 4,152,438 dunams.

Grains (2)

Grains: of 4,367,629 dunams under grain cultivation, the Palestinians owned and cultivated 4,152,438 dunams.

Grains (3)

Grains: of 4,367,629 dunams under grain cultivation, the Palestinians owned and cultivated 4,152,438 dunams.

Grains (4)

Grains: of 4,367,629 dunams under grain cultivation, the Palestinians owned and cultivated 4,152,438 dunams.

Bananas

Bananas: 60 percent of the area planted with bananas was Palestinian-owned and cultivated.

Vines

Vines: 86 percent of the area planted with vines was Palestinian-owned and cultivated.

Olives

Olives: of 600,133 dunams, 99 percent was Palestinian-owned and cultivated.

Vegetable Distribution

Vegetables: of 279,940 dunams, 239,733 dunams were Palestinian-owned and cultivated.

Tobacco

Tobacco: the area under tobacco cultivation was restricted by the Mandatory government to avoid overproduction. Virtually all the land under tobacco cultivation was Palestinian-owned.

Livestock (1)

The animal wealth of the country was also largely Palestinian-owned.

Livestock (2)

The animal wealth of the country was also largely Palestinian-owned.

The Jaffa Orange: The Palestinian Gift to the World

#'s 149-157 Today the Jaffa orange is the agricultural product that is most closely associated with Israeli production. Yet Palestinian expertise had already developed the Jaffa orange before Zionist colonization of Palestine got under way.

Looking Out to Sea

Jaffa, looking out to sea. Until 1936, before the development of the Haifa and Tel Aviv harbors, Jaffa was the main seaport of Palestine.

Nuzhah Quarter from Jaffa

Jaffa, looking toward the new Palestinian residential Nuzhah quarter, ca. 1935. Note the contrast in means of transportation with the previous photograph.

Tiberias (2)

Tiberias, looking north toward Mount Hermon, ca. 1935.

Taji Family Residence

The residence of the Taji family, Wadi Hunayn, near Ramleh, ca. 1934.

View of the Old City

Looking west at the Old City of Jerusalem from the Palestine Archaeological Museum, ca. 1937. In the middle ground is Bab al-Zahirah (Herod's Gate). The building nearest right is the al-Rashidiyyah Secondary School for Boys.

Looking Out Over Jerusalem

Looking northeast at a Palestinian residential quarter just outside Bab al-Zahirah, Jerusalem.

Snowed In

The Old City of Jerusalem under snow, looking toward the Mount of Olives.

Beersheba's Mosque

The mosque at Beersheba; its architecture is late Ottoman.

The All-Palestine Boy Scout Jamboree

Bir Salim, near Ramleh, 1926. Seated center, third row, is Humphrey Bowman, British director of the Department of Education.

...And Its Base: The Village School (1)

At the other end of the spectrum were the village schools. The two schools pictured here are typical of some 420 village schools that existed in Palestine by the end of the Mandate.

...And Its Base: The Village School (2)

At the other end of the spectrum were the village schools. The two schools pictured here (228 and 229) are typical of some 420 village schools that existed in Palestine by the end of the Mandate.

Sabotage

A train derailed by guerrillas, summer 1936.

The Haganah Starts its Offensive

The farmhouse of the Abu Laban family, prosperous Palestinian orange growers, near Petah Tikva.

Acre

Acre, looking south toward the Old City and the new suburbs beyond. By the end of the Mandate the total population of Acre was ca. 12,360, of whom ca. 50 were Jews and the rest Palestinians.

The Town of Safed, northern Galilee

The town of Safed in northern Galilee; the round objects in the foreground are "hay cakes" drying in the sun (they were placed under cooking vessels to protect the latter from direct contact with the fire) . By the end of the Mandate the total population of Safed was ca. 11,930, of whom ca.

Ramallah's terraces and houses

Houses and terraces of Ramallah. By the end of the Mandate the total population of Ramallah was ca. 5,000, all of whom were Palestinians, the majority Christians. Ramallah was captured by Israel during the 1967 War.

Nablus

The population of Nablus (ca. 23,000 by the end of the Mandate) was entirely Palestinian.

Hebron, from a balcony

Hebron, from a balcony. The population of Hebron (ca. 25,000 by the end of the Mandate) was entirely Palestinian. The city was captured by Israel in 1967.

Gaza from Jabal Muntar

Gaza, from Jabal Muntar, 1943. The population of Gaza (ca. 34,000 by the end of the Mandate) was entirely Palestinian. The city was captured by Israel in 1956, and again in 1967.

Aerial view of Beit Jala

Beit Jala, near Bethlehem, from the air. At the end of the Mandate its population was ca. 4,000, almost all of whom were Christian Palestinians. The village was captured by Israel in 1967.

The Stout Sea Walls of Acre

The stout sea walls of Acre, originally constructed in the ninth century A.D.

Jaffa, mid-1940s

Jaffa in the mid-1940s. By the end of the Mandate Jaffa's population was about 100,000, of whom about 30 percent were Jews and the rest Palestinians.

A villa in Ramallah

Distinctive local architecture: a villa in Ramallah.

Gather around

Except three gentlemen (the second, third, and fourth from the left in the first standing row), all the others are Christian Palestinians representing a cross-section of ages and professions.

The occasion for this gathering is unknown; the location, Nablus; the date, ca. 1925.

Shepherds and a Schoolmaster

Shepherds and a schoolmaster, with their respective flocks, cross paths outside the Church of All Nations, Gethsemane.

Government Girls' School

Girl Guides of the Government Girls' School in Nazareth, 1940.